What are SNAP benefits

what are SNAP benefits

What are SNAP benefits? This article aims to answer that question as well as the populations SNAP serves, monthly income limits, and maximum SNAP monthly payouts.

What are SNAP benefits?

Helps people buy the food they need for good health. People also can buy garden seeds with SNAP benefits.

SNAP food benefits are put on to the Lone Star Card and can be used just like a credit card at any store that accepts SNAP.

SNAP can’t be used to:

  • Buy tobacco.
  • Buy alcoholic drinks.
  • Buy things you can’t eat or drink.
  • Pay for food bills you owe.

Who SNAP is for?

  • People who don’t have a lot of money as long as they meet program rules.
  • Most adults age 18 to 49 with no children in the home can get SNAP for only 3 months in a 3-year period. The benefit period might be longer if the person works at least 20 hours a week or is in a job or training program. Some adults might not have to work to get benefits, such as those who have a disability or are pregnant.

Maximum monthly income limits

The following chart gives a general idea of the amount of money (income) a person or family can get and still be in this program. Some people might be able to get benefits even if their income is higher than what is listed in this chart.

Maximum monthly income limits
Family size Monthly amount
of income allowed
1 $1,634
2 $2,203
3 $2,772
4 $3,342
5 $3,911
For each additional person, add: $572

Other SNAP facts

Most people age 16 to 59 must follow work rules to get SNAP benefits. Work rules mean a person must look for a job or be in an approved work program. If the person has a job, they can’t quit without a good reason.

Maximum monthly SNAP amount

Maximum Monthly SNAP Amount
Family size Monthly SNAP amount
1 $194
2 $357
3 $511
4 $649
5 $771
6 $925
7 $1,022
8 $1,169
For each additional person, add: $146

Nick Bryant is a Counselor with 10 years of experience working in community health. He enjoys concerts, mocking Dallas Cowboy fans and creating easy to understand community resources on his site HoustonCaseManagers.com. To become a more saucy social worker, hop on his free email list and receive weekly community resource guides delivered directly to your inbox.